Creating a Rogue-like (like Vampire Survivors) - Part 15

Creating a Rogue-like (like Vampire Survivors) in Unity — Part 15: Weapon System Revamp

This article is a part of the series:
Creating a Rogue-like Shoot 'Em Up (like Vampire Survivors) in Unity

This part of Vampire Survivors has been 2 months in the making, and it contains enough content to be split into 3 or 4 parts. Nevertheless, I decided to release it as a single part because there was no natural place I could split this part into.

This part contains a lot of advanced coding concepts that can help you take your programming to the next level if you've been following our series, because it contains a lot of reorganising of code to make our game easier to manage. At higher levels, good coding is often a matter of organisation rather than knowledge, because organising your codebase well will allow you to very easily create new content; and a poorly-organised codebase will be hell to work with when you create a lot of content. Hence, this part will be very helpful to those of you looking to take your coding skills to the next level.

In Part 15 of the Vampire Survivors series, we will be covering the rework of the weapon system so that it will be more flexible and intuitive to use. In essence, we are making the weapon system more integrated, so that our weapon data files will not be spread across multiple prefabs and data files:

Weapon data spread across multiple files.
Our weapon data for different levels was spread across multiple files, making them hard to manage.

Instead, we want all our level data, as well as our weapon evolution data, to all be kept within a single data file:

New weapon data setup
We want all our data to be contained within a single file.
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Creating an Underwater Survival Game like Subnautica Part 9 – Tools III

This article is a part of the series:
Creating an Underwater Survival Game (like Subnautica) in Unity

Video authored, edited and subtitled by Sarah Kagda.

Ever wanted to create a game like Subnautica in Unity? Check out Part 9 of our guide here, where we set up more tools for the game.

A link to a package containing the project files of this tutorial series can also be found at the end of this article, exclusive to Patreon subscribers only.

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Converting between Unity's Render Pipelines

How to convert your assets between the different render pipelines (built-in, URP and HDRP) in Unity

Unity offers you the opportunity to use three different pre-built pipelines suited for different purposes:

  1. The Built-In Render Pipeline, which all assets use initially, is a general-use pipeline that has limited customisation.
  2. Universal Render Pipeline (or URP) is a quick and easy-to-customise pipeline that allows you to create optimised graphics suitable for lower-end devices like mobile phones.
  3. Conversely, the High Definition Render Pipeline (or HDRP) is a pipeline is meant for creating cutting-edge high-quality graphics for higher-end devices.

Because of all these different pipelines, when you’re buying assets from the Unity Asset Store, these files may not always be in the right format for the render pipeline your project is using.

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Creating an Underwater Survival Game like Subnautica Part 8 – Tools II

This article is a part of the series:
Creating an Underwater Survival Game (like Subnautica) in Unity

Video authored, edited and subtitled by Sarah Kagda.

Ever wanted to create a game like Subnautica in Unity? Check out Part 8 of our guide here, where we set up more tools for the game.

A link to a package containing the project files of this tutorial series can also be found at the end of this article, exclusive to Patreon subscribers only.

To view this content, you must be a member of Terresquall's Patreon at $5 or more
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Creating a Farming RPG (like Harvest Moon) in Unity — Part 20: Animal Movement

This article is a part of the series:
Creating a Farming RPG (like Harvest Moon) in Unity

Ever wanted to create a game like Harvest Moon in Unity? Check out Part 20 of our guide here, where we go through how to Making Chickens Wander in the Coop.

A link to a package containing the project files up to Part 20 of this tutorial series can also be found at the end of this article, exclusive to Patreon supporters only.

To view this content, you must be a member of Terresquall's Patreon at $5 or more
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Creating a Farming RPG (like Harvest Moon) in Unity — Part 19: Naming and Spawning Chickens

This article is a part of the series:
Creating a Farming RPG (like Harvest Moon) in Unity

Ever wanted to create a game like Harvest Moon in Unity? Check out Part 19 of our guide here, where we set up a spawning system for the incubated chickens in the coop, as well as a system for naming these chickens. You can also find Part 18 of our guide here, where we went through how to create an incubator for chickens.

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Creating an Underwater Survival Game like Subnautica Part 7 — Tools

This article is a part of the series:
Creating an Underwater Survival Game (like Subnautica) in Unity

Video authored, edited and subtitled by Sarah Kagda.

Hello everyone and welcome to this installment of the Underwater Survival tutorial series. This time, we'll be focusing on Tool Usage, the Health System for entities in the game like mobs and the Player, and Particle Effects with a simple Object Pooler.

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Creating a Farming RPG (like Harvest Moon) in Unity — Part 18: Incubator for Chickens

This article is a part of the series:
Creating a Farming RPG (like Harvest Moon) in Unity

Ever wanted to create a game like Harvest Moon in Unity? Check out Part 18 of our guide here, where we go through how to create an incubator for chickens. You can also find Part 17 of our guide here, where we went through how to give NPC Gifts and display relationship information.

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Creating an Underwater Survival Game like Subnautica Part 6 — Hotbar

This article is a part of the series:
Creating an Underwater Survival Game (like Subnautica) in Unity

Video authored, edited and subtitled by Sarah Kagda.

Hello everyone, and welcome to this installment of the Underwater Survival tutorial series! Here, I'll guide you through creating a Hotbar — a potentially crucial part of the player's UI — in your game.

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Creating a Rogue-like (like Vampire Survivors) in Unity — Implementing Mobile Compatibility: Part 1

This article is a part of the series:
Creating a Rogue-like Shoot 'Em Up (like Vampire Survivors) in Unity

Update 22 January 2024: There was a bug in our Virtual Joystick Pack that we’ve fixed. If you were having problems getting the joystick to work after exiting the game and restarting it, please redownload the pack and reimport it into your project.

Implementing Mobile Compatibility is a short series of articles that will complement our main Vampire Survivors series. As the name suggests, in this series of articles, we will be exploring how to bring mobile compatibility to the game that we have been building in our main series.

Specifically, in this article (and the accompanying video that will be released soon), I will be covering — in general — the things to consider when introducing mobile compatibility to a game, as well as how to port the movement controls (the only mode of control in the game) to a mobile interface.

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